It doesn’t matter where the grass is greener

The grass is always greener is a phrase I often hear.

It is said when we

  1. Complain about the tragedy of our current circumstance while simultaneously being afraid to change it
  2. Decide to take a leap of faith to greener pastures only to find out it was as dried up as the one we left behind
  3. Attempt to prevent someone from making a change we think is bad.

But whatever the reason, I suppose the real question is: Does it matter where the grass is green?

What does the metaphor represent?

To me, the grass is always greener is a metaphor for stasis. It represents a line. On one side of the line, it is your current state. It is a state you are familiar with. A familiar surrounding, even when it is glum, is still comfortable. And when you’re comfortable, it’s hard to want to take the risk. And if we do, regardless of if the risk pays off or not, we tend to miss the familiarity of an environment we’ve grown so used to.

On the other side of the line, is a hope. It is a hope for a better circumstance, one that might not have been afforded to us in our current one. That’s why we aim for it. Because a hope is always better than the current situation because it is the concoction of the mind.

Therefore, the grass is always greener is simply a metaphor that represents the line between familiarity and hope. It means nothing. It is something we say to console ourselves or others for a bad choice. It is also to prevent ourselves or others from taking a risk. The reality is, we should embrace these choices, both good and bad, and their outcomes.

It means nothing. The grass is greener is something we say to console ourselves or others for a bad choice. It is also to prevent ourselves or others from taking a risk.

The reality is, we should embrace these choices, both good and bad, and their outcomes.

Because what is life without a risking it for hope?

But to first take these types of risk, you must first figure out how you would define your success. Here’s an article I wrote on how I define what success looks to me.